As the mother of a 4-year-old and an 18 months old boy whom I’ve lovingly breastfed their entire lives, I’ve heard all kinds of things while nursing. From random snickering at Starbucks to silly AF questions that women (sometimes even other mothers) ask me about breastfeeding a child older than six months. Here are the most asked breastfeeding questions I get, plus my super honest answers. 

1. “He’s so big, doesn’t he bite when he suckles”?

I can’t tell you how many times other women have asked me this. My response usually goes something like this: “Ma’am, do you bite when you suck?” LOL!! Naturally, a teething baby can occasionally graze your nipple with his or her teeth, but on average they do not bite.

2. “Aren’t you apprehensive about publicly displaying your breasts?”
No, I’m not. I will whip these boobies out when my child needs it. If I’ve got to watch you wolf down a plate of food like a wild animal, talking with your mouth full at a restaurant; then you can manage not looking at me while I feed my hungry baby.

If I’ve got to watch you wolf down a plate of food like a wild animal, talking with your mouth full at a restaurant; then you can manage not looking at me while I feed my hungry baby.

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3. “How long do you plan on doing this for?”
Well considering that breastfeeding is not an egg timer on some proverbial milk stand counter… For most mothers, breastfeeding is not a 3-12 month #goal. It is a lifestyle. The point is to nourish your little humans until they are done needing it or wanting it. So many individual factors go into deciding when to stop or how long to nurse, and no matter what you decide someone somewhere is going to have something to say about it. So, lay off–I’ll stop nursing when I stop nursing.

4. “Do you ‘pump and dump’ your breast milk?”
Despite the popularity of this concept there is no real evidence that shows pumping and dumping one’s liquid gold after 1 or 2 glasses of wine is necessary. In fact, studies show pumping and dumping does not speed the removal of alcohol from breast milk. So rather then throw it all away, time your next feeding for a couple of hours after your last drink. And when you

see me raising a glass, please don’t kill my buzz.

5. “Ewww! You’ve used donor milk?”
Yes, nosey, I have used donor milk and after having a high supply of milk from my first child I’ve even donated. So, no, there is no shame in it. With numerous secure groups for lactating mothers who have a high supply of healthy milk to share, there is no reason why any mother should go at this process alone. [CONSIDER LINKING TO 4th PHASE BLOG POST: https://zmxi8qkpspv1qjhu-44323209372.shopifypreview.com/blogs/news/blog-post-test]

Carrie, Mom of 2—Englewood, NJ 

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